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GFW: Northbrook College / Boutique Catwalk Show

02-06-2014   


First to show, for Northbrook College, with great skill was Olivia Evans. Her collection in soft, nude pastels featured stunning appliqué, wide, rounded shoulders and sparkling ruffled foil. A favourite piece was a pair of trousers in pastel pink with a tapered waist – set high to the midriff at the front and dropping to the lower back.

Atosa Nikkah showcased stunning hand painted, abstract prints with bold, brightly coloured brush strokes on oversized, structured caped dresses – the prints were highlighted with subtle additions of coloured foil.

Lauren Nash’s collection was incredibly commercial in a range of pastels, every outfit in a single colour range, styled perfectly. Oversized eyelets and wide-legged turn-up trousers added an edge of utility to the collection while softer fabrics and gentle silhouettes remained feminine. Using a range of shaggy, knotted knitwear and chunky knit scarves, Corrina Smith contrasted classic, sweeping, bias cut maxi dresses.

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Georgia Bruton waved the flag for hipster London with a collection of off-beat, kooky pieces in sequined fabrics with oversized slogans and bright, clashing colours, reminiscent of Ashish a few seasons ago. Mixed fabrics and structured oversized jackets worn with low lung trousers and exposed midriffs were accessorized with heart shaped, looped earrings, jangling anklets and huge flatform sandals.

Menswear by Anna De Souza opened with a pink crocheted jumper and continued to feature crochet elements with polka dot trousers and oversized monochrome check. Tight, tailored suits were accessorized with polka dotted handkerchiefs and neckerchiefs tied in bows.

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Anna De Souza

Beautiful heelless shoes, with wooden loops accessorized the collection by Amy Frederiksson which used oriental draping and structured jackets in organic, petal like forms – caped jackets with gentle curving layers contrasted with sharp, raw edges and murky digital prints.

The only collection showing Lingerie and Loungewear from the college came from Kirsty Trinkett. Satin velveteen in damask prints showed bright flashes of purple and teal while the main collection was based in deep navy. Using organza inserts and sparkling jewelled appliqué decorated long line lingerie while the flowing, loungewear gave the collection an air of vintage luxury. 

Another collection showing contrast between traditional, modest dress and contemporary styles came from Mehreen Paracha in toned of mustard, flaming bright orange and contrasting navy. Double layered skirts, tight trousers and deep cut harem pants were styled with cape like suede jackets with intricate laser cut designs.

Also twisting classic shaped into something more exciting was Emily Durcan who created a collection in mainly black with geometric shaped additions. Pyramid structures added to the hips and chest contrasted against a feminine shape with flashes of bold orange for a dash of colour.

Nicole Poynter used a kitsch print as a base, with birds and hand drawn flowers, this was brought alive be florescent colours, floating silks and flared, feminine silhouettes. Bootlegged trousers were belted with thick swathes of fabric and topped with tight, jewelled bodices.

Sarah Barron’s collection was clearly influenced by the utilitarian designs from countries such as Japan. Strong shapes were seen through silhouettes such as a wide rounded hooded gillet. The geometric pieces were emphasized by the lack of colour in the collection. The final dash of colour came in a gold printed foil, with a 3D cubic image – the entire collection showing great technical skill.

The closing designer for this show was a popular choice – Vanessa Ofori-Boafo’s menswear was heavily afro-influenced. Leather strips weaved into jackets, laser cutting, splashes of sparkle and cotton suits with a touch of traditional print combined for a consistent collection. The final closing piece was accompanied by a giant, tasseled white parasol, which cut an impressive figure on the runway.

By Jemima Daisy




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