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Fashion Revolution 2016 #WHOMADEMYCLOTHES

18-02-2020   


This year, Fashion Revolution’s annual campaign will call on consumers around the world to show the label in their clothing, post a photograph on social media, tag the brand they’re wearing and ask the question #whomademyclothes.

fashion rev 2016 show label

 

fash rev 16 red posterThe week-long celebrity-backed promotion across 84 countries worldwide will seek to ignite a revolution to radically change the way our clothes are sourced, produced and purchased. 

Fashion Revolution 2016 will directly challenge every stakeholder in the fashion supply chain – retailers, brands, factories and private label manufacturers, to start to tackle exploitation in the industry by demonstrating transparency.

Companies will be invited to show responsibility for the individuals and communities on which their business depends, by showing consumers the faces and stories of thousands of farmers, makers and producers who make our clothes, answering with the hashtag #imadeyourclothes.

Fashion Revolution Week 2016 will feature hundreds of activities, stunts and social experiments in countries across the world to demand a fairer, cleaner, more transparent and more beautiful fashion industry – starting with Fashion Question Time at the UK Houses of Parliament on Monday 18th April hosted by Mary Creagh MP. Panellists will include Livia Firth and leading fashion industry experts.

Together with Ethical Consumer, Fashion Revolution will publish a Transparency Index, assessing 40 of the top selling global and national brands in the UK.

Following the success of the #haulternative launch with Youtube vloggers Noodlerella, CutiePieMarzia, Shameless Maya and Bip Ling, celebrity fashion influencers and consumers around the world will be invited to create their own #haulternative video online, a way of refreshing our wardrobe without buying new clothes.

Orsola de Castro, Co-Founder of Fashion Revolution said: “Who Made My Clothes should be a simple question. Most people would expect a brand to at least know the final factory where their garments are cut and sewn. The Behind the Barcode Fashion Report published last year found that 48% of brands hadn’t traced the factories where their garments were made, 75% didn’t know where their fabrics came from and 91% didn’t know where the raw materials came from.

“Brands rarely acknowledge that the clothes they sell have been made by thousands of people working in factories, fields and other hidden places around the world. The global fashion industry is opaque, exploitative and environmentally damaging and desperately needs revolutionary change. Producers have become faceless and this is costing lives.

On 24 April 2013, 1134 people were killed and 2500 injured when the Rana Plaza factory complex collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The Rana Plaza disaster was a metaphorical call to arms, sparking a consumer appetite for revolutionary change in the fashion industry.

Fashion Revolution’s mantra is ‘Be Curious, Find Out and Do Something’ about it.  Consumers can take part in the campaign by showing the label in their clothing, posting a photograph on social media, tagging the brand and asking the question #whomademyclothes to get the real story behind what they’re wearing.

For further information and other ideas on how to get involved, visit www.fashionrevolution.org

Images courtesy of fashionrevolution.org, red poster image shot by Stephanie Sian Smith

Related articles:

Conscious to the Core – Novel Beings

Fashion Enter Celebrates Fashion Revolution Day

Behind the Barcode

 




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